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Health Literacy Podcast: latest episodes

Talking about the many ways we can improve health information.

Episode 1: Dr Ruth DeSouza (click here) 
(22 Minutes, 30 seconds)

Matt & Amir are joined by Ruth DeSouza a health researcher with a passion for health literacy.

She speaks about two new projects she has been working on, a new tool to improve health information and how technology that tracks your fitness is changing the way we think about health information.

Matt also talks about the upcoming ‘Drop the Jargon” day and Amir considers what health information will look like in the future. Please join us.

Music courtesy of Purple Planet

This week’s guest: Dr Ruth DeSouza

Ruth has worked as a nurse, therapist, educator and researcher. Ruth’s participatory research with communities is shaped by critical, feminist, and postcolonial approaches

Ruth contributes to migration and health-related activities through being a steering committee member of The Centre for Global Migrations Research Theme at Otago University, Dunedin, New Zealand; an associate of the Centre for Applied Cross-cultural Research Te Pae Rangahau Tauhōkai Ahurea and a member of the Migration Research Network, hosted by eSocSci Hui Rangahau Tahi.

She is also a member of: the Research Institute on Social Cohesion (Department of Premier and Cabinet, State Government of Victoria) and on the Scientific Committee of the 1st World Congress on Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Health – Diversity and Health, 17-19 May 2018 – Edinburgh, Scotland. She’s a member of the sub-working group on refugee women’s health within The Migrant and Refugee Women’s Health Initiative (a joint project by The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Migration Council Australia) and  a reference group member of the Victorian Transcultural Mental Health Education and Service Development Consultancy at St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne.

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