03 9418 9929 enquiries@ceh.org.au

She looks up, concerned. She is young, in a room full of men her father’s age. The material she has to deal with is sexual. How did it come to this? She looks to him and they both know all is lost.

Don’t be that person who has omitted critical information when making a booking for an interpreter!

In this case the worker neglected to write that the ‘health’ topic was sexual health and the audience was a group of men.

The information session did not get past the introductory remarks before it was abandoned. True story.

Apart from the awkwardness of the situation, the resources required to organise and promote this event for a hard-to-reach migrant community came to naught. Furthermore, trust was lost within this community towards the agency that attempted this community engagement.

The good news is that the interpreter was paid in full for her booking. She was not at fault.  Had the interpreter agency received the omitted information she either would not have received this request, or, received it and exercised her choice to decline the assignment.

For more information on what information should be included in booking for an interpreter, tune in to our upcoming

 

CEH FREE webinar:

4 steps to Working effectively with Interpreters

October 24, 12-12:30 pm

REGISTER HERE: https://cehinterpreters.eventbrite.com

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