Checking existing translations

If you are using existing translated materials, you need to first check whether the content and meaning of the resource is what you are after.

Here are some steps to guide you through how to check existing translations.

Step 1: Consult with the original producer of the materials

Translated materials can be very context specific and are often developed with a particular target audience in mind. Remember, ethnic communities are not all the same– there are age, gender, economic and geographic differences to consider.

It may not always be possible, but talking to the producers of the original materials will assist you to determine whether the materials are appropriate for your particular target audience.

Find out more about the translated material by asking the original producer these questions:

  • Who was the target audience of the original materials?
  • Did you test the translated resources on community focus group?
  • How have you used the materials?
  • Are the materials copyrighted?
  • Can you have permission to use or modify them?
  • Do you have an English version of the materials

 

Step 2: Locate the English version

Step 3: Check the accuracy of the health messages

It is up to you to determine whether the health messages and information contained in the resource are appropriate.

Check with a health professional if the health messages are accurate, current and complete. Use the English version of the translated resource (if available) to assist. 

Step 4: Focus test materials with the target audience

You can conduct a focus group with the target audience to check the translations of the materials.  For tips on how to test the translations on the community, visit here.

 

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